The Weight of Thought

galaxyclusters:

starsands0ns:

shep689:

tsud123:

chrstopher:

A family from Hammond, Indiana is suing the Hammond Police department for excessive force after what should’ve been a routine traffic stop turned violent. Lisa Mahone was driving with her boyfriend Jamal Jones and her two children to Stroger Hospital when Hammond police pulled her over for not wearing a seatbelt. Mahone admitted to the violation and asked for a ticket so she could continue on her way to the hospital to visit her dying mother.

Though Mahone was the operator of the vehicle and produced valid identification and proof of insurance, police demanded to see identification from Jones as well. Jones informed the officers he didn’t have ID, as he recently received a ticket. After attempting to reach into the backseat and produce the ticket from a backpack, the officers drew their guns.

Mahone’s 14-year-old son then began recording the encounter with his cell phone and Mahone dialed 911. 

According to Fox Chicago
, an officer told Jones “”I don’t know you and I don’t know what you’re going to do.” Jones told the cops “That’s why I have my windows up. I’m not no harm to you right now. I got my kids in the car and you’re drawing your weapon.”

Police refused to take the ticket from Jones as ID and ordered him out of the vehicle. “Once the kids were scared, I wasn’t gonna get out of the car and leave my kids in the car,” said Jones. “He was being so aggressive.”

While Mahone was relating the story as it happened to the 911 operator, Jones demanded to see a “white shirt,” a commanding officer. The officer on the scene told Jones “Look at my shoulder dumbass. I got bars.” Video shows that after asking Jones another time if he was going to exit the car, an officer then breaks the passenger window, shocks Jones with a taser, then pulls him out of the car.

SIGNAL. BOOST.

holy fucking shit I can’t believe this. HOW IS THIS NOT ALL OVER THE NEWS. what the FUCK is happening with the police across this country.

Fuck disgusting people

This is so revolting that I feel physically sick.

shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

coelasquid:

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

You mean we don’t still take people’s brains out and rub them in salt to dispel the devil and cure headaches? I’m pretty sure that’s established medieval protocol, wouldn’t want to mix things up.

coelasquid:

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

You mean we don’t still take people’s brains out and rub them in salt to dispel the devil and cure headaches? I’m pretty sure that’s established medieval protocol, wouldn’t want to mix things up.

”’How do you explain to your child, she was born to be hurt?' This line from Imitation of Life evokes the United States in its last desperate years of institutionalized racism. It seems more than coincidence that Douglas Sirk filmed his masterpiece in late summer of 1958, less than three years after Rosa Parks sat down in that bus in Montgomery and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led the boycott. Only a few years earlier, neither Hollywood nor the American public would have accepted this picture. (Even the 1934 Imitation of Life, conservative, safe, and devoid of subtext, encountered roadblocks…) In the spirit of those times, what might Juanita Moore’s lines to Lana Turner— ‘How do you explain to your child, she was born to be hurt?’ —have meant to audiences north and south when the film opened in 1959? What does it mean today? And how might we, in the ‘progressive’ twenty-first century, explain to those audiences at the the tail end of a similar era, that so much has changed, and so little?”
—Sam Staggs, Born to Be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life

The judge overseeing Detroit’s bankruptcy ruled Monday that the city can continue to shut off water if people can’t pay their bill.

Judge Steven Rhodes said there was no “enforceable right” to water and the Detroit water department would face a significant risk of higher defaults if a moratorium was issued. “The last thing it needs is this hit to its revenues,” he said.

Detroit’s Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) began shutting off water to customers who were behind on payments this spring, cutting off around 22,000 people between March and August.

London (AFP) - The British inventor of the World Wide Web warned on Saturday that the freedom of the internet is under threat by governments and corporations interested in controlling the web.

Tim Berners-Lee, a computer scientist who invented the web 25 years ago, called for a bill of rights that would guarantee the independence of the internet and ensure users’ privacy.

"If a company can control your access to the internet, if they can control which websites they go to, then they have tremendous control over your life," Berners-Lee said at the London "Web We Want" festival on the future of the internet.

While remembering your telephone number or what time you made dinner reservations for tomorrow night may not flood you with feelings, many memories have emotions attached to them; your first day at school, your wedding day, losing your pet.

It’s been known for some time that these emotional associations, or valences, are malleable. Therapists even take advantage of this intrinsic property of memory in order to treat patients with conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. However, the neural mechanisms that enable us to switch emotional associations have long been a mystery. Now, in a new MIT study, neuroscientists have revealed the neuronal circuit that is critical for the association of emotion with memory. Furthermore, they have demonstrated that they can reverse the valence of a memory by activating specific populations of brain cells. The study has been published in Nature.

Let’s talk about the science of climate change… or should we say global warming? In the latest episode of Veritasium, Derek explains why using the correct terminology is important and debunks 13 common misconceptions.

Have you heard the one about how the Earth isn’t actually getting any warmer? Has a ‘skeptical’ friend shared an old and suspiciously inadequate graph on Facebook to prove their point that all this talk about temperatures rising is a load of paranoid rubbish? The latest episode of Veritasium is here to debunk that myth, and many others, including, “Wait, didn’t scientists say the climate was actually cooling? Do scientists even have any idea what they’re doing?”

Finally, meet Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, a fantastic swimmer and the biggest meat-eating dinosaur ever discovered. This 95-million-year-old Cretaceous predator had a massive, spiny sail on its back, and it paddled in the river, eating sharks. Whole sharks. The findings were published in Science this week.

The very first S. aegyptiacus fossils were discovered about a century ago in the Egyptian Sahara, and it was named “spine reptile.” Those first fossils were housed at the Bavarian State Collection, but were destroyed in World War II during an April 1944 Royal Air Force raid of Munich. “We had to wait close to 100 years for a new skeleton,” Nizar Ibrahim from the University of Chicago says in a telebriefing statement. “The animal we are resurrecting is so bizarre, it is going to force dinosaur experts to rethink many things they thought they knew.”

Paleontologists working on desert cliffs called the Kem Kem beds in eastern Morocco recently unearthed a more complete set of fossils — including portions of a skull, axial column, pelvic girdle, and limbs — that suggests the dinosaur was semi-aquatic. This is a first: Dinosaurs were thought to be terrestrial, having never colonized aquatic environments like marine reptiles.

hornyteen1936:

the baby boomer culture: how an entire generation literally will not shut up about young people doing things they enjoy

hornyteen1936:

the baby boomer culture: how an entire generation literally will not shut up about young people doing things they enjoy