The Weight of Thought
dagwolf:

Police militarization is now a press freedom issue. HuffPost statement on the arrest of their reporter in #Ferguson: pic.twitter.com/bLWf26oKxM
— Freedom of the Press (@FreedomofPress) August 14, 2014

dagwolf:

Police militarization is now a press freedom issue. HuffPost statement on the arrest of their reporter in #Fergusonpic.twitter.com/bLWf26oKxM

— Freedom of the Press (@FreedomofPress) August 14, 2014

As protests continued over the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown at police hands Wednesday night, officials in Ferguson have not even released the name of the officer who fired the fatal shots. Police have insisted they are committed to self-improvement and racial justice, as residents testify at local fora that they are exhausted and fed up by the harassment and racial profiling that plagues the majority-black town with a majority-white police force. Police shouted over the megaphone, “Your right to demonstrate is not being obstructed,” according to some accounts. But overnight Wednesday, a stark picture emerged of residents chanting and screaming (some bottles were reportedly thrown but did not hit officers), as cops treat them as if they were at war. The violence culminated with an announcement Thursday morning that Gov. Jay Nixon (D) will likely be relieving the St. Louis County police of their duties. Here’s how police have been conducting themselves:
Rampant deployment of rubber bullets, tear gas and smoke bombs, including on private homes

usagicutie:

new shirt!!!

usagicutie:

new shirt!!!

kaedytheawesome:

guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

This makes me scared about if well even have trees in 20-30 years

kaedytheawesome:

guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

This makes me scared about if well even have trees in 20-30 years

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

naturepunk:

1onewolff:

naturepunk:

1onewolff:

naturepunk:

@mastermindunkown said:Who’s shentea and diamond? Do you have photos of them yet?:)

Here are some photos of the lovely pups who’ll be sharing my home and life with me for the next few months or so. Shentea is the short-haired female pup; Diamond is the long-haired male. They are half-siblings (same father, different mother) from a breeder who thinks he is creating wolfdogs, but who is, in actuality, just crossing malamute and German shepherd mixes to get wulfdoges

This is what irresponsible breeding and misrepresentation lead to. This is why it’s so important for the public to educate themselves about what real wolfdogs look and act like, and why it’s so vital that these two beautiful pups find a safe haven before it’s too late. 

Their current owner can’t keep them; because of the wolfdog thing, the shelters cannot take them; their only other option is either finding a foster, or euthanasia. It’s infuriating that dropping the “wolfdog bomb” on an innocent dog can do so much harm, but we’re all hopeful that these two will make a safe and comfortable transition to their new lives here at the mini-farm, and that with some time, training, and a lot of patience, they will eventually become adoptable canine companions for two very lucky people. 

 

Shelters won’t take them even though they’re not genuine wolf? I don’t understand how

1. They can just be like ‘oh he SAYS they’re wolves so we believe it not gunna do any sort of physical exam to find out otherwise

And

2. How it’s still fucking legal to breed ‘wolfdogs’ and sell them to the general public.

It’s a liability for the shelter. Even though these animals have been professionally phenotyped as non-wolfdogs, the “wolfdog bomb” has already been dropped, so from a legal standpoint, it’s very risky for the shelter to take these animals in. They just won’t do it. If they did, they’d likely have to put them down. It all comes back to that damned rabies vaccine issue, wherein most wolfdogs are not approved for vaccinations, because the company which produces them claims that they don’t work on dogs with wolf genetics. You can read more on that topic HERE

As for lying breeders - I’ve heard of a few cases wherein misreppers have been reported for fraud, but have yet to hear what happens as a result of these charges. It should be illegal for people to sell wuldoges as wolfdogs, but frankly, most people who purchase animals from such places don’t care enough to educate themselves in the first place and are, therefore, unwilling to believe that their animals are anything but wolfdogs, even when that claim directly endangers the animals’ lives. 

Which is totally and completely fucked up. 

What I also meant by that second comment was how is it legal for someone to breed legitimate wolf dogs for sale? If these animals are prone to be more wolf than dog how can someone legally be permitted to sell an animal that will endanger anyone without the knowledge to care for them properly?

And even then, knowing the proper handling of such an animal isn’t necessarily going to prevent either the owner or the wolfdog from harm. Jude is low-content right? And even you, with tons of experience dealing with various animals, still have issues with his behavior that will never dissipate because that’s just his instinct. Even owners who have managed to keep their wolfdog semi-behaved for years still tend to lose them to animal control after a few incidents (e.g. certain states with 3-strike laws will seize these expert escape artists)

Good question! Actually, one of the main reasons real wolfdog breeders are so adamant about screening potential buyers with utmost scrutiny is to prevent these animals from ending up in the wrong hands. Even then, most have contracts with the buyers that stipulate a return policy if the owner is incapable of handling the animal. 

Many states likewise have laws regarding wolfdog ownership - in most places, wolves and F1 wolfdogs are completely illegal. It gets a bit more complicated when it comes to the lower-content animals. You can read more about different states’ exotic animal regulations HERE

Note that in several states, by simply claiming publicly that your dog is a “wolfdog”, you are denying yourself certain rights in a court of law if your animal bites someone - even if the animal is professionally phenotyped as a non-wolfdog. This means that, in those states, anyone who calls their husky mix a ‘wolfdog’ is endangering the life of their animal. No DNA test or professional phenotype can save it’s life if you’ve already announced that it’s a “wolfdog”. 

As for behavior problems in wolfdogs - yes, they do have them. Certainly more intensely so than a typical northern breed dog. But that doesn’t make them inherently dangerous in most cases. Jude is a low-content animal, and is still too much for most people to handle, but he sure has come a long way since we first got him in December. Back then, he didn’t even know the sound of his own name. So things are improving, even if it is a lot of work to make any manner of headway with him, and no, he will never behave like a typical domestic dog.

I wouldn’t say that wolfdogs are bad animals, but they are certainly NOT good pets for the average Joe. You can read a more in-depth explanation about the absolute minimum requirements for owning a low-content animal, like Jude, HERE

Hope this helps! 

pbstv:

No one knows how this new, mysterious thruster works. But if it really does, it could give us new access to deep space.
Learn more from NOVA Next.

pbstv:

No one knows how this new, mysterious thruster works. But if it really does, it could give us new access to deep space.

Learn more from NOVA Next.

scienceisbeauty:

This molecular model shows the parts of the Ebola virus scientists are studying in the hopes of finding drugs that will slow the spread of the disease. -a creepy disease by the way-
Source: Why Ebola is so dangerous (BBC)
Google News

scienceisbeauty:

This molecular model shows the parts of the Ebola virus scientists are studying in the hopes of finding drugs that will slow the spread of the disease. -a creepy disease by the way-

Source: Why Ebola is so dangerous (BBC)

Google News

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill claiming to improve the transparency of Endangered Species Act listings, but scientists and conservationists say the bill is more about gutting the law.

On Tuesday, the Republican-led House passed the Endangered Species Transparency and Reasonableness Act, H.R. 4315, which bundled four bills sponsored by Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., that seek to change various aspects of the Endangered Species Act.

Rep. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyo., made her case on the House floor Tuesday.

“I rise in enthusiastic support of the Endangered Species Act, and I rise in enthusiastic support of this bill,” Lummis said. “This bill will help (the ESA) goals because we will know what science is being used to base these decisions upon. We want to know so it can be vetted by third parties.”