The Weight of Thought
neongenesist:

Under the Dog got funded! Aim for the movie stretch goal. Go donate, yo.
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neongenesist:

Under the Dog got funded! Aim for the movie stretch goal. Go donate, yo.

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Minnesotan contractor Andrey Rudenko is now the king of his castle; his 3D-printed concrete castle, that is. After completing a journey that took more than two years, Rudenko developed a customized 3D printer to extrude concrete and build a castle that he had designed himself. The entire structure is approximately 3 meters by 5 meters, which really makes it an amazing backyard fort rather than an actual livable structure.

Extruding concrete to create 3D-printed buildings isn’t entirely novel. It has been proposed to quickly create inexpensive housing in poverty-stricken areas and even to build infrastructure on Mars before the arrival of astronauts. However, those buildings were designed to be fairly simple and lacked architectural details. Though it was really just a matter of time before a castle was created in this manner, it’s doubtful anyone expected it to come from Minnesota

Scientists at Arizona State University (ASU) have discovered the cocktail of genes that facilitate tail regeneration in lizards. With further research, it may eventually be possible to target the pathways identified in human cells in order to regenerate various tissues in patients with injuries or birth defects. The study has been published in PLOS ONE.

The ability of certain vertebrates to regrow lost appendages has intrigued scientists for years. Zebrafish can regenerate their caudal fins and salamanders can regrow both limbs and tails. Perhaps the most interesting example is the lizard which can self-amputate its tail in response to threat and grow a new one. Humans are a little more inadequate in this department, but researchers believe that understanding the process in other organisms could one day help us develop techniques to regenerate human tissue.

kaesworld:

The realist shit ever

kaesworld:

The realist shit ever

amnhnyc:

One hundred years ago today, on September 1, 1914, Martha, the last-known living Passenger Pigeon died at the Cincinnati Zoo. Her death, at 29 after a lifetime in captivity, marked the disappearance of her once-abundant species from the world.

Difficult as it is to comprehend, there was a time when the Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) was the most common bird in the United States, numbering in the billions. But victim to overhunting and habitat destruction, Passenger Pigeon populations began to decline in the second half of the 19th century and the species was considered extinct in the wild by the turn of the century.

Learn more about passenger pigeons, and about the sciene of de-extinction. 

fuckyeahsexanddrugs:

funnyandhilarious:

This Is What Stress Does To A Chicken »

posted by funnyandhilarious? 😒

I think a few “bots” or fake accounts are following me….

forgedhalo:

moscow subway by Waldemar-Kazak

How introduction of wolves to the Yellowstone National Park helped curb the deer population, relieve vegeitation to regrow, attract other animal species and help strengthen river channels.

nomorethumbs:

Peggy Oki, Queen of the Z-Boys.
The only female to grace the Zephyr skate team.