The Weight of Thought
thepeoplesrecord:

Obama’s reelection marks the 899th day of detention without charge for Pfc. Manning.
Here’s to four more years of drone strikes, the war on whistleblowers, indefinite detention of Americans in military camps without trial or charge, more Guantanamo renovations, the expansion of the prison industrial complex, billions in funding for the Israeli apartheid, public education cuts, the ever-expanding targeted kill/capture list, the failed War on Drugs, etc. etc. etc.!
Now, let’s organize. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Obama’s reelection marks the 899th day of detention without charge for Pfc. Manning.

Here’s to four more years of drone strikes, the war on whistleblowers, indefinite detention of Americans in military camps without trial or charge, more Guantanamo renovations, the expansion of the prison industrial complex, billions in funding for the Israeli apartheid, public education cuts, the ever-expanding targeted kill/capture list, the failed War on Drugs, etc. etc. etc.!

Now, let’s organize. 

Critics of President George W. Bush’s anti-terrorism efforts, mainly Democrats and some Republicans, rejoiced when Barack Obama was elected. They were convinced that what they considered the post-Sept. 11 trampling of constitutional rights and civil liberties would end.

As a candidate, Obama, a former constitutional law professor, promised to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as well as to end indefinite detention and the rendition of terrorism suspects to other countries, where they often were tortured. He also vowed greater accountability and transparency in the conduct of war.

Opponents of a U.S. law they claim may subject them to indefinite military detention for activities including news reporting and political activism persuaded a federal judge to temporarily block the measure.

U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan yesterday ruled in favor of a group of writers and activists who sued President Barack Obama, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and the Defense Department, claiming a provision of the National Defense Authorization Act, signed into law Dec. 31, puts them in fear that they could be arrested and held by U.S. armed forces.

The complaint was filed Jan. 13 by a group including former New York Times reporter Christopher Hedges. The plaintiffs contend a section of the law allows for detention of citizens and permanent residents taken into custody in the U.S. on “suspicion of providing substantial support” to people engaged in hostilities against the U.S., such as al-Qaeda.

OAS Human Rights Organization Agrees to Hear Gitmo Case, Could Challenge NDAA

Francisco Quintana: First time an international rights body takes up US violations at Gitmo, could lead to case on NDAA detentions